Online Anthology of Lyrical Audio Poetry in Modern English, recorded by Walter Rufus Eagles ad majorem Dei gloriam


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All spoken voice  recordings on  www.eaglesweb.com, its two front pages (index and default) and two alternate front page masters, and its 4,806 other files and directories, excluding image files and music files, are licensed under a Creative Commons License unless otherwise identified on one of the pages. 

eaglesweb.com
poetry for the ear in the tradition of blind Homer 

The music you are now hearing is "Echo Pavan & Galliard " [Musica Britannica 114] by William Byrd, a contemporary of Shakespeare.  The work was sequenced by Canadian harpsichordist John Sankey, to whom I owe a debt of gratitude for his kind permission to use all of his many recordings on Eaglesweb.com.

POEMA AD LIBITUM, Fortnights IV-V (July 23 - August 19, 2004)
chosen at the discretion of your reader, with his notes where appropriate.

Color Codes:

Blue = Newly recorded in Part II 
May 1, 2004  to April 30, 2006

Red = Replay from Part I
May 1, 2002 to April 30, 2004

Click HERE for listing for other fortnights of the Poema ad Libitum series.
Recorded and posted August 17, 2004 0100 GMT

Thomas Hardy [1840-1928][British novelist and poet]:
A Meeting with Despair [1:23]

Recorded and posted August 16, 2004 2320 GMT

John Masefield [1878-1967][British poet-laureate, 1930 until his death]
A Wanderer's Song [1:08][recorded as above]
Sea Fever [0:58][His most famous sea poem]

Recorded and posted August 12, 2004 2340 GMT

Wm. Shakespeare [15641616][English actor, director, playwright and poet]
Carpe Diem [0:34]

Recorded and posted August 12, 2004 0500 GMT

Herbert Asquith [1873-1953] [British Prime Minister, Liberal Party (1908-1916) and war poet]
The Fallen Subaltern [01:16]
The Volunteer [0:55]

Posted August 10, 2004 0400 GMT

William Faulkner [1897-1962][American (Southern) writer, winner of Nobel Prize]: 
Excerpt from As I Lay Dying [0:19] [recorded August 9, 2004]

Posted August 9, 2004 0245 GMT

Matthew Arnold [1822-1888][British]: [recorded August 9, 2004]
Growing Old [1:36]
John Keats, who died very young, did not write of this subject.  However, many poets live past seventy (myself included) and they inevitably do so.  Hear also Wm. Butler Yeats: Sailing to Byzantium; Alfred, Lord Tennyson: Ulysses (and also his Tithonus).  From a usually humorous poet, hear Ogden Nash: Old Men [0:18] and Untitled [written near the end of Nash's life][0:18]

Posted August 8, 2004 0045 GMT

Percy Bysshe Shelley [1792-1822][British]: translator,
Love Song from 'Cyclops' [0:28] by Euripides [480-406 BC](right).  The latter was the last, chronologically, in the line of the "Trinity" of classical Greek tragedy playwrights after Aeschylus (the first) and Sophocles.  Euripides can be considered the "father" of modern drama.  (Certainly the American playwright Tennessee Williams owed a great deal to Euripides.)    

Posted July 30, 2004 0430 GMT

Robert Bridges [1844-1930][British]
My Delight and Thy Delight [0:51]
To the United States of America [0:53] [a war poem]
[recorded July 30, 2004]

Posted July 29, 2004 0045 GMT

Edmund Spenser
[1552-1599] [prolific English poet and sonneteer]
Sonnet 54:: "Of this worlds theatre in which we stay. . ." [0:49][recorded July 29, 2004]

Posted July 23, 2004 0030 GMT

Edwin Arlington Robinson [1869-1935][American]

The Dark Hills [0:26]
The Mill [1:03]
Miniver Cheevy [1:15]
Sonnet: Richard Cory [0:55]
Prior to his discovery by President Theodore Roosevelt, Edwin Arlington Robinson [1869-1935] was a New York subway inspector. Previous to this job experience, the poet had attended classes at Harvard and was published in the Harvard Advocate.  His subsequent attempt at self-publication failed to support him, whereupon he took the job with the subway.  Teddy Roosevelt had read his poetry and liked it, and appointed him to a government job with the U.S. Customs Service for a five year sinecure, after the end of which Robinson dedicated his next volume of verse to the President. The poet was a friend and confidante of the American poet Amy Lowell [1874-1925], whose poetry is also heard on this website.  - W.R.E.

Click on the poet's name above to go to his or her page.  Click on the name of the poem to hear the reading.
     
     All audio recordings copyright 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004 Walter Rufus Eagles.
All audio reproduction rights reserved.

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Click HERE to go back to  POEMA AD LIBITUM, Fortnight I (June 10 - June 24 2004)
Click HERE to go back to  POEMA AD LIBITUM, Fortnight II (June 25 - July  8, 2004)
Click HERE to go back to  POEMA AD LIBITUM, Fortnight III (July 9 - July 22, 2004)
Click HERE to go forward to POEMA AD LIBITUM, Fortnight VI (August 20  - September 2, 2004)
Click HERE to go forward to POEMA AD LIBITUM, Fortnight VII (September 3  - September 16, 2004)
Click HERE to go forward to POEMA AD LIBITUM, Fortnight VIII (September 17 - September 30, 2004)
Click HERE to go forward to POEMA AD LIBITUM, Fortnight IX (October 1 - October 14, 2004)
Click HERE to go forward to POEMA AD LIBITUM, Fortnight X (October 15 - October 28, 2004)
Click HERE to go forward to POEMA AD LIBITUM, Fortnight XI (October 29- November 11, 2004)
Click HERE to go forward to POEMA AD LIBITUM, Fortnight XII (November 12- November 25, 2004)
Click HERE to go forward to POEMA AD LIBITUM, Fortnight XIII (November 26 - December 9, 2004)
Click HERE to go forward to POEMA AD LIBITUM, Fortnight XIV (December 10 - December 23, 2004)

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